ther photograph of the same construction – with the thumb of my cooperating assistant P 🙂

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Here on the left you see the double sided sticky tape, stuck to the transparant film.
Measure the lenght of your video tape, and make it a bit longer than your long piece of copper tape, joining the two little pieces of copper tape.

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Stick the video tape on the transparant plastic film full of double sided sticky tape. Very important: make sure that the conductive side of the video tape is orientated towards the copper band, when all is glued together. (The white bits left on the plastic films are just the pieces of paper of the double sided sticky tape.)

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We measure! The length of the video tape will determine the resistance of your resistor. Now we stick it all together, the video tape covers the copper tape, but they should not touch without a little pressure…

We know using this technology involves taking some big risks, and that’s okay. We have practice for that when we play real money slots.

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We have glued it all together and we measure again!

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Now two measurements with some finger pressure (the place where your finger pushes on the tape determins the length of the cunductivity, hence the resistance!)

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Yeay it works 🙂
For the usability of the resistor, we soldered on three little pieces of wire on the copper tape. Solder very quickly, because the copper tape is hyperconductive and all could melt..

In case of unclarity – questions can be asked 🙂
This self made resistor was developed by Johannes Taelman.